About

The corona crisis has demanded of individuals, families and societies a complete re-assessment of the functions and boundaries of the home. The lockdown required that private spaces accommodate typically public activities such as work, school, day-care, exercise, concerts, and religious practices. Meanwhile, the everyday life of the household became more segregated and hermetic. These shifts have made visible social, architectural, digital and existential structures of the home, bringing to the fore risks and potential of relevance for future homes.

The STAY HOME project will document experiences and initiatives and identify new insights and practices regarding the home which have emerged during the corona crisis. It trawls ethnographic archives collected in projects led by our collaborators and concerned with digital practices, daily life, reading habits and domestic violence.

Funded by the Carlsberg Foundation and based at the University of Copenhagen the project is conducted by a cross-disciplinary team from the Faculties of Theology and Humanities (UCPH), The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture (KADK) and the IT University of Copenhagen which will analyse these data in order to uncover insights that may benefit future homes and the life led there. The interdisciplinary approach is developed in an ongoing exchange with historical research into the home and its social, spatial, technological and existential implications conducted at the Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Privacy Studies.

PI: Mette Birkedal Bruun (Church History / Privacy).

CO-PIs: Brit Ross Winthereik (Science and Technology Studies), Karen A. Vallgårda (Family History), and Peter Thule Kristensen (Architecture and Interiors).

Research Team: Anne-Milla Kristensen (Theology), Katja de Neergaard (Science and Technology Studies), Katrine R. Larsen (Family History), and Nicholas T. Lee (Architecture and Interiors).

Editor: Emma Klakk, cand.scient.soc.